Westminster Befriend a Family

November Volunteer of the Month: Ali

WBAF

November Volunteer of the Month: Ali

A bit about Ali and his mentee Joseph.

Ali, 27, has been mentoring 17 year-old Joseph (not his real name), for five months. As one of Westminster Befriend a Family’s volunteers he plays a crucial role in helping Joe realise his potential. Joe doesn’t have his parents around, only his siblings. His family has been fractured and his background has been severely coloured by the whole experience.

What was Ali’s biggest challenge?

At first, Joe’s experiences made it hard for him to trust people, said Ali. “When I first met him, Joe found it very difficult to find the right words when trying to explain himself. He wasn’t doing anything with his life. He wasn’t in education, he wasn’t working. He never took anything seriously and, at such a young age, he had kind of given up on life. His background has been very difficult and I would say he was a bit ‘broken’ in a way. But soon he began to trust me and we developed a connection.”

What was the result of making that connection?

“Now, he’s taking things a little more seriously,” said Ali. “He enrolled in and is going to college, so he’s getting up and out of the house, at least. He’s able to explain himself more clearly and he’s grown in confidence. And while it’s still too soon to see where he is headed – there will be time for him to work that out later – he’s much more optimistic about his future than he was.”

How has mentoring Joe helped Ali?

Ali’s own life has benefited from his mentoring, too. Even though he has completed his studies in architecture and an internship at an architecture and design company, Ali still wasn’t sure of his abilities to be a mentor and to communicate clearly.

He said: “Now I feel I am a much better communicator. I am more confident in my abilities to show Joe, or any young person, a way forward than I was when I started. In the beginning I didn’t know whether what I was doing with him was helping or not. Five months on I see that my methods are working and that has made me much more certain of myself.”

More about our mentoring scheme

Westminster Befriend a Family’s mentoring and befriending programmes only last for six months at a time during which volunteers spend two to three hours on the same day every week building trust and lending their support. This way, families get the support they need while they take crucial steps forward. However, they are also given the space to manage their own future and become more self-reliant.

What’s next for Ali?

When Ali finishes his time with Joe, he’s considering being a mentor for another vulnerable young person, referred to Westminster Befriend a Family, who is in much need of support.

From all of us at Westminster Befriend a Family, thank you Ali for all your hard work and continued commitment to helping support vulnerable families in Westminster.

If you’d like to volunteer click www.befriendafamily.co.uk/volunteer-8/ and find out more.

boy holding hand

“Nobody has helped me like WBAF”

Sarah had deteriorating living conditions

Sarah is originally from Afghanistan. A mother of two sons, Ahmed and Abdullah, she has benefited from a range of support services from Westminster Befriend a Family (WBAF), including emotional support and help with translating and reading of documents.

Recently WBAF helped Sarah get funding for some essential household items. She had a leaky washing machine so was unable to use it, and a bed with broken slats and a mattress with protruding springs, so she regularly slept on the floor against her doctor’s advice. Deteriorating living conditions often meant sleepless nights and mounting stress, which in turn affected the well-being of her sons.

With the help of WBAF’s befriending volunteer, Sarah was able to apply for a grant to purchase a new washing machine and one new mattress, used by her eldest son. Less than she needed but hugely appreciated. It has gone a long way to reducing her stress and lifting her mood.

“Nobody has helped me like WBAF,” she said, and WBAF continues to help Sarah and her family help themselves.